Nkhundi is one of the villages in the area near Kusamala’s Nature’s Gift Permaculture Centre. Like many other villages in the country, people in Nkhundi face problems of water access, erosion, soil infertility, access to input and output markets, malnutrition as well as weather shocks. In the dry season, most women spend time selling vegetables and most men do piece work in town.

Luwayo facilitating a training session

Luwayo facilitating a training session

Despite being closer to town and the state house (Kamuzu Palace), the village has a whole lot of challenges to face. In my view, Nkhundi should have been the lucky one. From a different perspective, this village does not need a multi-million dollar project to improve their livelihoods. Simple initiatives that build the capacity of the community member can change their lives forever. Initiatives that help them think beyond aid, initiatives that help them define the path they want to go in life and pursue ambitions they perceive to be desirable. They need to be given tools that are beyond materialism. It is against this background that Kusamala through the JANEEMO Permaculture project is intensifying permaculture in Nkhundi village.

Kusamala conducted a Permaculture training workshop from the 5th to the 9th of June that brought 20 members from Nkundi village. The farmers were hosted at Kumbali village, which is about 15 minutes walk from NGP centre. They went through a 5 day training.

Certificates after the course

Certificates after the course

Kusamala’s Luwayo Bizwick (Permaculture Trainer) did not hold a word but storm them with all the necessary information they needed. Co-facilitated by Isaac Kamphinda and Chisomo Kamchacha, the 5 days were a time to remember. Nicely tailored through the course were practicals. The farmers made compost manure, liquid manure and other practicals to ensure the hands-on aspect of permaculture.

The climax of the training workshop was the final day which was Sunday the 9th of June. Getting certified is always a beautiful thing and the farmers were certified for taking the course and headed back to their village to practice permaculture.

The 20 farmers that have been trained shall establish their own permaculture gardens around their homes and also use permaculture in their field in the long run. These shall become homestead demonstrations and will be used to teach others. In the quest to engender permaculture, eight of the farmers were women, four were young men and eight were older men. It is expected that this project will help to improve food and livelihood security of the trained farmers and their families.

Trainees showing their certificates